The Midtown Neighborhood

Cleveland's Epicenter—A vibrant tableau of architects, photographers, designers, artists, museums, performing arts, and concert venues. Emblematic of its creative core, MidTown is now home to 11 architecture firms, some with deep roots in the area and others just establishing themselves here. Home to several notable institutions, historic sites and community figures including the late Congressman Louis Stokes, Phyllis Wheatley Association, Cuyahoga Community College, The Agora Complex, and Dunham Tavern to name a few. This area home to the Health-Tech Corridor-an attractive and competitive area in which to invest and locate emerging businesses and research facilities. MidTown Cleveland has historically been a center of innovation with a diverse business, manufacturing and residential base. It is a place where innovation is continuing to take place today.

 
mtc-2016-annualreport-online-10-7-16_Page_01.jpg

CLEVELAND'S MOST VIBRANT DOWNTOWN NEIGHBORHOOD

MidTown Neighborhood—A true mixed-use technology district where business, industry, services, retail, entertainment, and residents coexist and intersect.  Just minutes from the Downtown Cleveland Central Business District, the Cleveland Clinic, University Hospitals, and Case Western Reserve University, MidTown Cleveland has historically been a center of innovation with a diverse business, manufacturing, and residential base. It is a place where innovation is continuing to take place today.

business_midtown.png

BUSINESS HAPPENS IN MIDTOWN

Businesses in MidTown make things—just as they have for over a hundred years. From paper and shipping labels to gene therapies and components for sophisticated medical equipment, manufacturers in MidTown are constantly innovating to compete in the global economy.

FORD.jpg

MIDTOWN IS HISTORIC

Once Millionaire’s Row—MidTown has a rich history and has built on this legacy, transforming historic buildings to house creative and innovative organizations that continue the heritage of invention and industriousness from decades ago. The mansions, brownstones, warehouses, and theater halls that made up MidTown in the first half of the 20th century are now sprinkled with tech startups, nonprofits, design firms, and loft apartments.